Call for Applicants: Three Doctoral Fellows in Management Accounting

Silvia Jordan and Albrecht Becker, both professors in the area of Management Accounting and thus part of the Department of Organization and Learning at the University of Innsbruck, are hiring three doctoral fellows by October 2010 (PDF of the call for applications in German and English):

Positions 1 and 2: Research assistants in the Austrian Science Fund (FWF)-funded research project „Healthcare quality assessment in Austria: Discourses and performances“
  • Assistance and co-operation in the research project „Healthcare quality assessment in Austria: Discourses and performances“
  • 3-year contract, 75% (30 hours per week)
Position 3: Research and teaching assistant in the management accounting group
  • Assistance and co-operation in research and teaching in the management accounting group
  • 3-year contract, 75% (30 hours per week)
What you can expect

Continue reading “Call for Applicants: Three Doctoral Fellows in Management Accounting”

Learning from Disasters: A ‘Framing’ Perspective

Was the launch of Siri a “disaster”? Depends on how you frame it. (Foto, CC BY-SA 2.0

This research essay is authored by Melissa Köhler, student in the master program Organization Studies at University of Innsbruck.

‘We do not learn from experiences… we learn from reflecting on experiences.’ (John Dewey)

Unexpected and unusual incidents in organizational life often result in a change from stable conditions into situations that are ‘far from equilibrium’ (Rudolph and Repenning, 2002). Even if undesirable incidents entail an organizational breakdown and misery, organizations can try to make sense of the circumstances. They have the possibility to reflect and learn in order to prevent such occasions, or to improve their response the next time. To understand how organizations learn from disasters, current scientific literature mainly analyzes very popular incidents such as the Mount Everest climbing accident in 1996 or natural catastrophes. In order to gain substantial insights on how organizations learn from disastrous situations, this focus on extreme incidents seems quite narrow-minded. Who defines whether a specific event is a disaster or not? A ‘Framing’ perspective could help to induce a better understanding on how organizations learn from such situations.

Continue reading “Learning from Disasters: A ‘Framing’ Perspective”

The Simulacrum of Massive Open Online Courses representing Open Educational Resources

This research essay is authored by Isabella Winkler, student in the master program Business Education at Universität Innsbruck and participant in the 2017 edition of the course “Open Organizations and Organizing Openness“.

(Foto: Pete, CC-BY 2.0)

Globalization and digitalization are keywords which characterize today’s society. The process of digitalization and dissemination of data has already found its way into education. It is one of the biggest concerns when talking about modernizations in educational systems (Dobusch & Heimstädt, 2016). One primary goal of recent education is to make knowledge accessible anywhere, anytime and for anyone. As a result education becomes egalitarian and contributes to the public’s welfare. In his educational ideal Humboldt already registered that it is the state’s duty to make knowledge available for everyone even for the poorest (Gaisbauer, Kaperer, Koch & Sedmak, 2013). Going one step further beyond open access for everybody the UNESCO has come up with the conception of Open Educational Resources (OER). “OER are teaching, learning, and research resources that reside in the public domain or have been released under an intellectual property license that permits their free use or re-purposing by others.” (Atkins, Brown & Hammond, 2007, p. 4).

What also came along with this Open Education Movement were Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) in the segment of higher education. Since 2008 these educational opportunities offered by universities and commercial organizations have shaped the educational infrastructure. The number of MOOCs has rapidly grown in the last ten years because educational institutions have to fulfill the needs of potential students and to meet the requirements of the fast changing educational market towards learner-centered and individualized learning methods. MOOCs are online courses which provide each person free access to university level education without paying a fee and without the need to fulfill certain admission requirements (Yuan & Powell, 2013). Though, at this point it raises the question: To what extent does the ‘Open’ in Massive Open Online Courses correspond to the ‘Open’ in Open Educational Resources or do MOOCs not overcome the hurdle of providing only Open Access instead of Open Education? Continue reading “The Simulacrum of Massive Open Online Courses representing Open Educational Resources”

Workshop on “Approaches to Ethical Challenges in Business and Economics”

screenshot-workshop-aianiOn March 1, 2017 a one day workshop on “Approaches to Ethical Challenges in Business and Economics: Religious and Cultural Contributions” organized by University of Innsbruck in cooperation with the Austrian Israeli Academic Network (AIANI) takes place Claudiana, (Herzog-Friedrich-Straße 3, 2nd floor). Among the speakers are Rabbi Barry Leff (The Neshamah Center) and Richard Weiskopf (University of Innsbruck).

The workshop is free of charge and a couple of places are still available for readers of this blog. If someone from the OS conjunction community is interested and flexible enough to join at the last minute, please send an e-mail to Andreas.Exenberger [at] uibk.ac.at.

Video, Manuskript und Slides der Antrittsvorlesung von Leonhard Dobusch zur “Organisation der Digitalität”

Mittlerweile sind die Videoaufzeichnung, Slides sowie die Manuskriptfassung der Antrittsvorlesung von Leonhard Dobusch online verfügbar:

Das Manuskript der Vorlesung findet sich in einem Beitrag bei netzpolitik.org.