Book Review of »Organizational Wrongdoing« edited by Palmer, Smith-Crowe, and Greenwood

Earlier this year I was asked to serve as an Organization Studies book reviewer for ‘Organizational Wrongdoing’ edited by Donald Palmer, Kristin Smith-Crowe, and Royston Greenwood. My review has now been published in the most recent issue of Organization Studies. The final paragraph summarizes my reading of the volume as follows:

The final chapter of the volume (Chapter 16 by Chugh and Kern) then returns to the individual level in presenting suggestions on how to conceptualize and practice “ethical learning”. The chapter is a truly worthy conclusion, providing concrete suggestions for management practice. At the same time, it is also prototypical for the volume as a whole, focusing on reflection at an individual level instead of more collective and political processes of dealing with organizational wrongdoing. The latter perspective would not only put more emphasis on processes of subjectivation in the course of attributing “wrongdoing” to individuals, but might also arrive at different suggestions for practice such as ideas related to criminal law for corporations. This would reflect the, at least partially, emergent character of organizational wrongdoing. Given the importance of political processes and institutional contexts for organizational wrongdoing highlighted by several of the contributions in this volume, political organizing based on solidarity is probably as important as ethical learning by individuals.

The full text of the book review is available at the journal’s website. As usual, please send me an e-mail in case you are interested but your institution does not provide access to the journal.

 

Research Blog Recommendation (1): Orgtheory.net

This series points to other research blogs of potential interest for the Organization Studies Innsbruck Community.

Orgtheory.net is a multi-author blog run mostly by US scholars. All bloggers at orgtheory.net share a strong research orientation and they take organization theory seriously. The basic load of the blog is provided by hard blogging researcher Fabio Rojas, professor of sociology at Indiana University.  He has also authored over 40 posts on “grad school rulez”, explaining everything there is to know about US graduate education and PhD programs (see also the e-book version).

Above all, orgtheory.net is one of the oldest and continuously filled blogs in the realm of organization studies and therefore a worthy first entry in this series. Check back soon for more recommendations.

At a glance:

  • Orgtheory.net provides timely assessment of current debates in organization theory from a US perspective.
  • URL: orgtheory.net
  • Twitter/Facebook: –

 

Neue Studie: Perspektiven für Open Educational Resources in Nordrhein-Westfalen

Innerhalb der bestehenden Rahmenbedingungen verstärkt die zunehmende Digitalisierung von Lehrmaterial zwei bestehende Probleme an Schulen: Zum einen gefährdet die Verbreitung von minderwertigen oder tendenziösen aber kostenfreien Onlinematerialien das Neutralitätsgebot der schulischen Lehre. Zum anderen bewegen sich LehrerInnen und SchülerInnen im alltäglichen Umgang mit Material mehr und mehr in urheberrechtlichen Graubereichen. In einer kürzlich veröffentlichten Studie (PDF, PDF-Kurzfassung) für das Forschungsinstitut für Gesellschaftliche Weiterentwicklung (FGW) habe ich gemeinsam mit Leonhard Dobusch Vorschläge dazu entwickelt, wie beide Probleme durch eine Öffnung der Lernmittelfinanzierung für Open Educational Resources adressiert werden können.

Continue reading “Neue Studie: Perspektiven für Open Educational Resources in Nordrhein-Westfalen”

Launch of the Blog »Organizing Openness: Concepts and Cases«

As Maximilian Heimstadt has announced earlier this week, we are currently working on a textbook on “Organizing Openness”. Given the topic of the book, we plan to also openly document the process of writing the textbook itself.

In the course of a kick-off meeting to launch the project in Vienna, we therefore started a blog on “Organizing Openness: Concepts and Cases” under O2C2.org (you can also follow the blog via Twitter at @O2C2project). In addition to continuous updates on the blog, we will also link to working documents for each of the chapters on the page “Textbook-in-Progress“, which will be open for anyone to comment.

New Project: Textbook on »Open Organizing«

Maximilian Heimstädt

Every year, Wikimedia Germany together with two partners (VolkswagenStiftung and Stifterverband) supports a small number of young scholars who are interested in the idea of open science. For eight months, these “Open Science Fellows” receive support to realize their own open science project outside the constraints of their research institution and culture. I was more than happy when in late September I got the message that my application for the class of 2017/18 was successful.

From October 2017 until 2018 I will receive financial support and mentoring (by the amazing Ina Blümel) to develop my personal open science project: Together with Leonhard Dobusch I will work on a management textbook on “Open Organizing” in which we intend to cover phenomena (e.g. open innovation, open strategy, open government) as well as theoretical concepts of openness (e.g. transparency, participation, boundaries). To make this project as open as possible, we will not only report on our progress on a dedicated blog (to be launched), but will make the textbook available as Open Educational Resource (OER). Using an open license (CC-BY or CC-BY-SA) anyone will be allowed to use, share, and remix the learning material for any purpose and at no cost.

This is a crosspost from Maximilian’s personal blog.

Call for Papers for a Special Issue in Ephemera: Speaking truth to power?

Together with fellow issue editors Randi Heinrichs and Bernadette Loacker, I am inviting contributions to an ephemera special issue on “Speaking truth to power? The ethico-politics of whistleblowing in contemporary mass-mediated economy” (PDF). From the Call for Papers:

[T]his special issue situates the experience of whistleblowing in the context of contemporary discourses and practices, such as security, transparency and accountability, and is thereby particularly interested in the exploration of the ethical and political dimensions and implications of practices of whistleblowing. It raises the question of who is considered to be qualified to blow the whistle, under which conditions, about what, in what forms, with what consequences, and with what relation to power (Foucault, 2001). How is the figure of the whistleblower socially and discursively constructed and is there, for example, a specific relation to gender, race and class implied? How and at what cost do whistleblowers as political actors constitute themselves as ethical subjects, capable of taking risks and posing a challenge, capable of governing themselves and of governing others? Moreover, why are we suddenly faced with a boom of whistleblowing and an intensified ‘problematisation’ of the phenomenon in so-called digital cultures? Or, from another perspective, for which social, political, legal and also technical difficulties is whistleblowing the answer?

Deadline for submissions is March 31, 2018. All contributions should be submitted to one of the issue editors: Randi Heinrichs (randi.heinrichs AT leuphana.de), Bernadette Loacker (b.loacker AT lancaster.ac.uk), Richard Weiskopf (richard.weiskopf AT uibk.ac.at). Please note that three categories of contributions are invited for the special issue: articles, notes, and reviews. Information about these types of contributions can be found at: http://www.ephemerajournal.org/how-submit. The submissions will undergo a double-blind review process. All submissions should follow ephemera’s submission guidelines (see the ‘Abc of formatting’ guide in particular). For further information, please contact me or one of the other special issue editors.

New Publication: »Memes as Games: The Evolution of a Digital Discourse Online«

Stylized depiction of the “Hope” meme (Seiffert-Brockmann et al., 2017)

Probably the most pervasive example of how the internet turned popular culture from read-only into read-write (Lessig, 2008) is internet memes. In a new paper published in New Media & Society, Jens Seiffert-Brockmann, Trevor Diehl and myself have tried theoretically capture the communication logic of how memes spread and evolve. This is the abstract:  Continue reading “New Publication: »Memes as Games: The Evolution of a Digital Discourse Online«”