Call for papers: 2020 EGOS Colloquium on Sustainability Transitions: Bridging Systems and Organizational Perspectives to Tackle Grand Challenges

Together with my colleagues Taran Thune (University of Oslo) and Jochen Markard ( ETH Zurich), I am convening a track on “Sustainability Transitions: Bridging Systems and Organizational Perspectives to Tackle Grand Challenges” on the forthcoming EGOS Colloquium in Hamburg in July 2020.  

Introduction to the theme

We live in a world facing a variety of grand challenges connected to environmental and societal sustainability, including food, water and energy security, climate change, natural disasters, poverty and inequality. How societies and organizations deal with such challenges, and commit to developing more sustainable futures, while discontinuing unsustainable businesses and practices is a key concern and research topic (Ferraro et al., 2015; Geels et al., 2017; George et al., 2016; Markard et al., 2012).
 
This sub-theme will bring together scholars who study grand sustainability challenges and transformation from different perspectives, including systems and organizations. We are particularly interested in contributions that explore new approaches, perspectives, and methods.

Read more on egosnet.org

 

Deadline

 Deadline for submission of short papers:

  • Tuesday January 14, 2020, 23:59 Central European Time (CET) 

We are looking forward to receiving your contributions! 

New Article in Organization Studies: »From Universalizing Transparency to the Interplay of Transparency Matrices«

On 26 October 2015, BBC News published an article entitled China ‘social credit’: Beijing sets up huge system. It describes how the Chinese government is building an ‘omnipotent “social credit” system that is meant to rate each citizen’s trustworthiness’. Warnings about the advent of ‘digital dictatorship’ and phrases like ‘Big Data meets Big Brother’ have proliferated in research and Western public media ever since, and they reflect a rapidly growing focus on the contemporary global process whereby power and control become entwined with digitalization and result in new and often concerning forms of transparency.

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Panel »Wege zur digitalen Souveranität« bei den Medientagen München 2019

Am Panel bei den #MTM19 mit Mackenzie Nelson (Algorithm Watch), Stefan Primbs (Bayrischer Rundfunk), Jan-Hendrik Passoth (TU München), Annika Sehl (Universität der Bundeswehr München) und Moderatorin Pauline Tillmann (Deine Korrespondentin); (Foto: Medientage München)

Im Rahmen der Medientage München 2019 durfte ich an einem spannenden Panel zum Thema “Wege zur digitalen Souveranität: Gemeinwohlorientierte Plattformen und offene Infrastrukturen” mitwirken. Ein Video der Diskussion ist mittlerweile bei YouTube verfügbar.

Einige Punkte, die mir wichtig waren, kurz zusammengefasst:

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Program of the 4th OS ConJunction Day: »Organizing Creativity and the Creativity of Organizing«

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It’s that time of the year again. The winter semester just started, the trees are turning from green to yellow, and, most importantly, the annual OS ConJunction Day is coming up! This year, it’s all about creativity and organizing. How is creativity organized? What role does creativity play in organizations? How do organizations make creativity valuable? These and many more questions will be explored in talks and a panel discussion. After the formal part, we look forward to nice conversations over food and drinks at Brennpunkt Coffee Competence.

Date:

November 29th 2019 at 3:00 p.m.

Kaiser Leopold Saal, Faculty of Theology

Karl-Rahner-Platz 3, 6020 Innsbruck

Program:

3:00 p.m. Meet and Greet

3:15 p.m. Welcome

Prof. Leonhard Dobusch & Prof. Richard Weiskopf

3:30 p.m. Research 1: How organizations make creativity valuable

Prof. Birthe Soppe

4:00 p.m. Panel Discussion: Creativity at work

5:00 p.m. Coffee break

5:30 p.m. Research 2: How creativity is organized

Prof. Elke Schüssler, University of Linz

6:00 p.m. Crossing Genealogies

                  Graduation speech and welcoming fresh(wo)men

6:30 p.m. Concluding Thoughts

7:00 p.m. Eat and Meet

                 Food, drinks, and conversation at Brennpunkt Coffee Competence

 

We kindly ask you to register for the OS ConJunction Day before November 15th 2019 under the following link. We are looking forward to your participation and hope to welcome many of you!

New Article: Predatory Publishing in Management Research: A Call for Open Peer Review

Inspired by a blog post about the dangers of predatory publishing and open peer review as a potential response, Maximilian Heimstädt and I decided to dig deeper into the issue. Specifically, we were able to get access to some data on (potentially) predatory journals in organization and management studies. Based upon the analysis of this data we developed some initial ideas – provocations for debate – regarding the potentials of open peer review for our own discipline. The article has now been published in the journal Management Learning:

Predatory journals have emerged as an unintended consequence of the Open Access paradigm. Predatory journals only supposedly or very superficially conduct peer review and accept manuscripts within days to skim off publication fees. In this provocation piece, we first explain how predatory journals exploit deficiencies of the traditional peer review process in times of Open Access publishing. We then explain two ways in which predatory journals may harm the management discipline: as an infrastructure for the dissemination of pseudo-science and as a vehicle to portray management research as pseudo-scientific. Analyzing data from a journal blacklist, we show that without the ability to validate their claims to conduct peer review, most of the 639 predatory management journals are quite difficult to demarcate from serious journals. To address this problem, we propose open peer review as a new governance mechanism for management journals. By making parts of their peer review process more transparent and inclusive, reputable journals can differentiate themselves from predatory journals and additionally contribute to a more developmental reviewing culture. Eventually, we discuss ways in which editors, reviewers, and authors can advocate reform of peer review.

The article is available as an open access full text.

Parlagram visualisiert worüber das österreichische Parlament spricht

Ziemlich genau zwölf Jahre nach der Ankündigung des ersten Momentum-Kongresses 2007 ist daraus im September 2019 mit dem Momentum Institut das Experiment eines “Think Tanks der Vielen” hervorgegangen. Wie schon beim Kongress bin ich Mitgründer und versuche als wissenschaftlicher Leiter den Dialog und wechselseitigen Transfer zwischen Wissenschaft, Politik und Zivilgesellschaft zu unterstützen.

Als eines der ersten Projekte ist seit kurzem das Parlagram online verfügbar. Das Online-Tool macht die Debatten im österreichischen Nationalrat für die Vielen durchsuchbar. Worüber reden die gewählten Volksvertreterinnen und Volksvertreter im Parlament eigentlich? Welche Themen und Anliegen finden Gehör, was bleibt im wörtlichen Sinne unerwähnt?

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Selling products or life stories? The storytelling of “hero” entrepreneurs

This essay is provided by Hannah Schupfer, student in the master program Organization Studies at University of Innsbruck, and based on her master thesis.

“The worlds most powerful person is the greatest storyteller” – Steve Jobs (1995)

Nowadays, the Silicon Valley is brimming with firms whose CEOs and founders apparently are role models for today’s generation of young entrepreneurs. Bill Gates, Steve Jobs, Larry Page and alike are regarded as geniuses in their areas of expertise. To the wider audience they are especially known for their entrepreneurial success story. How often did we hear the story about Bill Gates and how he made up his way from working in his garage to become the CEO of one of the world’s most famous companies? Or Mark Zuckerberg – do we start thinking about Facebook or do we maybe first think about the lucky college dropout?  

A relatively coherent group of people that share a similar background and hold certain attributes in common can – theoretically – be defined as a social category. In my master thesis, I investigated how the category of today’s “hero” entrepreneurs has been formed. Specifically, I analyzed how the Silicon Valley entrepreneurs “tell their story” which, I argue, influences how the social category of the hero entrepreneur is shaped and understood.

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