New Book Chapter: “The Relation between Openness and Closure in Open Strategy”

In any case, I would have been happy to contribute to the brand new “Cambridge Handbook of Open Strategy”, co-edited by David Seidl, (Universität Zürich), Richard Whittington (University of Oxford) and Georg von Krogh (ETH Zürich). Given that the chapter’s co-author is my sister Laura (Radboud University Nijmegen), I am even more proud about our contribution on “The Relation between Openness and Closure in Open Strategy: Programmatic and Constitutive Approaches to Openness”.  A short excerpt from the Introduction:

Two facets are all but universally present in current works on Open Strategy. First, while being aware of and addressing challenges and dilemmas associated with openness in strategy making (Hautz et al., 2017), increasing openness is mostly perceived as normatively good, as an ideal that should be achieved. […] Second, openness is mostly considered to be the opposite of closure, or at least the other endpoint of a continuum from closedness to various degrees of openness in terms of greater transparency or inclusion (Whittington et al., 2011).

Taken together, an affirmative perspective on openness as opposed to closure is central to a currently dominant programmatic approach, which is mainly concerned with putting openness into practice and unleashing its respective potential. However, as we will argue in this chapter, addressing many of the tensions or dilemmas observed in empirical endeavours to implement greater ‘openness’ could potentially benefit from another perspective, which understands openness (and closure) as a paradox (Putnam et al., 2016) where openness and closure appear contradictory but yet simultaneously depend on each other. Key for such a constitutive approach towards openness is that this paradox cannot be dissolved entirely but only addressed in a specific way, namely by legitimate forms of closure.

A pre-print version of the article is open access available at the Open Strategy Network, which features pre-prints of all chapters in the Handbook.

Looking back on the Academy of Management Annual Meeting 2018 in Chicago

As usual, healthy food is one of the best things about any visit to the US, here together with Blagoy Blagoev (University of Lüneburg), Maximilian Heimstädt (University of Witten/Herdecke) and my sister and co-author Laura (Radboud University, Nijmegen, NL)

Every other year (see post on the last visit in 2016) I enjoy taking part in the Academy of Management Annual Meeting, the world’s largest conference for management and organization studies scholars. This year the conference took place in Chicago. The following list is about my main activities there:

Interestingly and as a potential long-term save-the-date, the Academy of Management announced that for the first time in its history, the conference will take place in Europe – more specifically, in Copenhagen – in 2025. I am really looking forward to this event, albeit being curious how Copenhagen will manage to cope with hosting so many management and organization scholars at once. Probably should already think about booking a hotel room.. 😉